Carl Maria von Weber - Euryanthe: Overture

Carl Maria von Weber composed the opera Euryanthe  during the period 1822-23 and first presented it in Vienna on October 25, 1823. The work was based on a French medieval history of 13th century.  The year Euryanthe was presented was marked by Vienna's interest in Italian operas, particularly those of Rossini . Although the initail reception was enthusiastic, the opera lasted only twenty performances, with complaints about the libretto and the length of the opera. For the failure of the play, the somewhat wordy libretto of the poet and writer Helmina von Chézy was blamed. Franz Schubert also commented that "This is not music". Nevertheless, the introduction is an excellent example of orchestral writing and remains one of the best. The Overture begins with an extremely lively and cheerful phrase. Oboe and clarinet, supported by horn and trombones, then present a theme of three emphatic notes, followed by a shorter ascending group of notes (with a stressed rhythm). Soon t

Antonín Dvořák - Introduction


Although the founder of the Czech national music school was Bedřich Smetana, it was Antonín Leopold Dvořák who tossed the inexhaustible wealth of the musical tradition of bohemian land throughout the Western world. His compositions are dominated by a happy combination of academic rules, instinctive technique and folk sound colors.

An excellent recipient of every useful influence, the composer effectively assimilated and exploited creatively all the musical stimuli he received, either as a diligent student or as a nostalgic traveler.

Following the orders of emotion rather than logic, Dvořák composed music that is sincere, spontaneous that often reflects the smile of ordinary people, without, however, disregarding the sensitivity and needs of genuine and demanding friend.

A bridgemaker between folk and scholar, skillful in the application of the teachings of classical education, he completed work miraculous in variety, quality and purity.

His peaceful life and emotionally balanced, allowed him to devote himself seamlessly to the service of the art of sounds. The musical credit given to him is neither that of innovation nor that of uniqueness. He managed to mix with absolute success the melodies and rhythms of the old and new worlds, without subjugating one to another, without acknowledging the superiority of anyone.


(George Monemvasitis)



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