Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Telemann - Don Quixote

Telemann's talent of composing beautiful religious cantatas coexisted with his ability to write simple, folk melodies, of which Don Quixote is an excellent example.


Telemann infuriated many people with compositions, including the Don Quixote orchestral suite. In his days it was a rule tat composers of religious music did not engage in profitable complementary works, such as the composition of "light" music. The followers of tradition believed that anyone who was able to commit such frivolity could not be serious about his religion.

But Telemann was definitely serious. His cosmic works were humorous, but Don Quixote conveys his message as convincingly as any of his religious works. Don Quixote was completed in 1761 proving that the composer's talent for creating beautiful melodies, did not dry up over the years.

Fighting the windmills

This suite has seven parts. Inspired by the Spanish writer Cervantes' famous novel Don Quixote, it recounts a day of the life of the legendary Spanish knight who was jostled with windmills.

The first part, Overture, recreates musical images of characters of the story. First we meet Don Quixote himself (Quixote's Reveille - Bugle Call), with music that seems to be looking forward to it. A change in a more lively rhythm shows the hero starting his daily work, attacking the windmills. After that, in the fourth part, we witness his prolonged love sighs about the inaccessible Princess Dulcinea.

The next two parts feature the servant Sancho Panza and the horse Rocinante. Tellemann mocks every ridiculous situation, clumsy heroics and flirtatious sighs. On the contrary, the earthly elements of Sancho Panza's donkey, which is out of control, approach but never fall into a low standard farce/

A solo violin sets milder rhythms that end up hypnotically, as Don Quixote goes to his bed exhausted by jousts and sighs.

Tellemann precedes his time composing a play that tells a story. This was basically a feature of the classical style, a hundred years later.







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