Johann Strauss II - Kaiser-Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Op. 437

Strauss often played in the glittering Imperial balls, conducting the orchestra and playing the first violin at the same time.   The majestic launch of this fascinating waltz presents the backdrop of the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the hegemony of the Austrian Emperor Franz Joseph in 1888. Johann Strauss II was Music Director of the Dance Hesperides of the Imperial Court from 1863 to 1872 and composed on occasion for the celebration of an imperial anniversary. The ingenuity of the melody of the Emperor Waltz, which was originally orchestrated for a full orchestra, is such that it was easily adapted for the four or five instruments of a chamber ensemble by the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg in 1925. This waltz is a tender and somewhat melancholic work, which at times turns its gaze nostalgically to the old Vienna. The waltz praises the majesty and dignity of the old monarch, who was fully devoted to his people. It begins with a majestic, magnificent march, which soon re

Verdi - Don Carlos

"Don Carlos" was a French "grand opera" based on Schiller's work. This setting, designed by Charles-Antoine Cambon in 1867, expresses the French echo of the opera style, with the view of Paris in the background.

This opera of Giuseppe Verdi, based on the homonymous play by the German writer Schiller, was written for the Paris Opera in the style of the "grand opera" which Verdi himself love, as the French audience. 

Although it was adapted in Italian, it remains an uneven work that includes a lot of good music.

- Canzone del Velo


The hero of this opera is the son of the King of Spain, who is in love with his stepmother Elizabeth. In the dharming Moorish song, Canzone del Velo (Song of the Veil), Verdi demonstrates his knowledge of Spanish folk song, using bolero rhythms, flamingo-like decorations and exotic orchestration. 

Repetitions of the opening verses are a constant reminder of an evil vision and serve to maintain the coherence of the whole section.




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