Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Josef Anton Bruckner - Events in brief

The announcement of Anton Bruckner's death.

1824: 
Josef Anton Bruckner was born on September 4th in Ansfelden, Austria.
1834: Begins to replace his father in the organ.
1835: Completes his school education in Hörsching, where Johann Baptist Weiß was schoolmaster.
1837: In June his father dies. He is sent to the Augustinian monastery in Sankt Florian to become a choirboy.
1841: Trained in Linz as a teacher.
1845: Assistant teacher in Sankt Florian. He falls in love with Louise Bogner.
1851: Permanent organist in Sankt Florian. His first visit to Vienna.
1855: Becomes a student of the famous Vienna music theorist Simon Sechter.
1863: Listens to Wagner's Tannhäuser opera.
1866: Completes Symphony No. 1 in C minor.
1868: Professor of music theory at the Vienna Conservatory.
1871: Visits England and impresses audience at Royal Albert Hall.
1872: The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra rejects Symphony No. 2.
1893: His health deteriorates. He's bedridden most of the year.
1896: Dies on October 11, in Vienna.

  •          When he was invited to conduct one of his works with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, during a rehearsal, Bruckner stood still on the podium. When after a few minutes he still did not lift his baguette, the first violin of the orchestra politely told him: "We are ready, Mr. Bruckner. You can start." "Oh, no," Bruckner said, "after you gentlemen."


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