Carl Maria von Weber - Euryanthe: Overture

Carl Maria von Weber composed the opera Euryanthe  during the period 1822-23 and first presented it in Vienna on October 25, 1823. The work was based on a French medieval history of 13th century.  The year Euryanthe was presented was marked by Vienna's interest in Italian operas, particularly those of Rossini . Although the initail reception was enthusiastic, the opera lasted only twenty performances, with complaints about the libretto and the length of the opera. For the failure of the play, the somewhat wordy libretto of the poet and writer Helmina von Chézy was blamed. Franz Schubert also commented that "This is not music". Nevertheless, the introduction is an excellent example of orchestral writing and remains one of the best. The Overture begins with an extremely lively and cheerful phrase. Oboe and clarinet, supported by horn and trombones, then present a theme of three emphatic notes, followed by a shorter ascending group of notes (with a stressed rhythm). Soon t

Domenico Scarlatti - Introduction


Domenico Skarlatti had to be released from the paternal domination and emigrate, in order to benefit the music by developing his jealous gifts. In search of the new, he focused his effort on composing for the keyboard instruments (mainly the harpsichord), which in his time, were constantly evolving and had invaded spectacularly in the lives of the music lovers.

The 555 sonatas for keyboard instruments that came to fruition from his creative mind are not just exercises of interpretation (essercizi), as he had named them and as was previously believable. They are an imaginative series of short compositions, which introduce new techniques of interpretation and herald the magnificent form of the tripartite sonata.

A rare arsenal of harmonious and rhythmic wealth is revealed by listening to these compositions by Domenico Skarlatti. He wasn't just a virtuoso performer, he was also a master of imagination. Mixes with exceptional subtlety and balance the polyphony with the monody. His writing is constantly met with the grace, spirit and elegance of the Baroque era. He doesn't imitate anyone. On the contrary, being innovative, he creates the conditions to imitate him.

Sonatas, the cutting edge of Domenico Skarlatti's much-documented work, were the subject of a major investigation and cataloguing. First the Italian pianist and composer Alessandro Logo dealt with the archiving and organization of these works. Their numbering is defined by the prefix L.

Newer is the work of the American harpsichordist Ralph Leonard Kirkpatrick. The list he has drawn up - where sonatas are defined by K - is considered definitive.

(George Monemvasitis)


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