Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Gioachino Rossini - La Danza (Tarantella Napoletana)

From 1830 to 1835, Gioachino Rossini composed various arias and duets for singers of Parisian society where he used to patronise. These works were published in a volume entitled Soirées Musicales in 1835. La Danza was written in the cheerful style of the 18th century tarantella. 

The orchestra creates the scene with the frenetic rhythm of the Neapolitan tarantella which was extremely popular at the time. The tenor enters holding an impressively long note and then joins wholeheartedly with the spirit of the work. The percussion section, which includes a cymbal, a drum and a triangle, complements the noisy but cheerful music.

The second half of the song features a military feel, with a sharp accompaniment played by the strings. The music breaks out in the chorus with a new glowing tonality and a short orchestral section leads to a second verse and to the final choral.


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