Maurice Ravel -The Swiss Watchmaker

Maurice Ravel was born on March 7, 1875, in the small fishing village of Ciboure in the Basque region, near the Franco-Spanish border.  His father, Pierre-Joseph, was a Frenchman of Swiss descent. Pierre-Joseph, a distinguished engineer, met and fell in love with his future wife, a young and beautiful Basque, Marie Delouart, at the time she worked on the Spanish railways.  A few months after Maurice's birth, the family moved from Ciboure to Paris. The parents of Maurice Ravel, Pierre-Joseph Ravel and Marie Delouart. Maurice had a happy childhood. The parents encouraged their two children - Edouard was born in 1878 - to follow their vocation. Maurice's inclination was music. He started music lessons at the age of seven.  Unlike the parents of other composers, Pierre-Joseph viewed positively the prospect of a musical career and sent Maurice to the France's most important musical college, the Conservatoire de Paris in 1889. In the same year, the Paris Exhibition brought toget

Johann Strauss II - Introduction


The works made up by members of the Strauss family are a wondrous as well as valuable bridge between folk and scholarly expressions of music.

Spearheaded by the numerous waltzes prepared by Johann Strauss II - in the catalogue of his works there are about four hundred - the most famous Viennese musical dynasty of the 19th century, was the only catalyst thanks to which a dance of rather humble origin was transformed into the all-light object of the desire for entertainment of the entire Austro-Hungarian, aristocracy initially, and ultimately, regardless of discrimination and stratifications, the whole civilized world.

Johan Strauss, the son, transformed the waltz into a great expression of the art of music, with a symphonic character, capable of captivating both the concert halls and the dance halls. He was rightly called the King of Waltz. The waltz dominated the thought and heart of the younger Strauss, but he did not fail to endow with his inspirations and other short works of musical or dance magnificence such as marches, polkas, cantrilies.

But the operettas he signed are not of minor value.

His elegant, witty music was challenged and considered light and naive. But what greater vindication than the well-confessed admiration of Brahms, Wagner, Shenberg, Berg and Webern?


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