Carl Maria von Weber - Euryanthe: Overture

Carl Maria von Weber composed the opera Euryanthe  during the period 1822-23 and first presented it in Vienna on October 25, 1823. The work was based on a French medieval history of 13th century.  The year Euryanthe was presented was marked by Vienna's interest in Italian operas, particularly those of Rossini . Although the initail reception was enthusiastic, the opera lasted only twenty performances, with complaints about the libretto and the length of the opera. For the failure of the play, the somewhat wordy libretto of the poet and writer Helmina von Chézy was blamed. Franz Schubert also commented that "This is not music". Nevertheless, the introduction is an excellent example of orchestral writing and remains one of the best. The Overture begins with an extremely lively and cheerful phrase. Oboe and clarinet, supported by horn and trombones, then present a theme of three emphatic notes, followed by a shorter ascending group of notes (with a stressed rhythm). Soon t

Johann Strauss II - Introduction


The works made up by members of the Strauss family are a wondrous as well as valuable bridge between folk and scholarly expressions of music.

Spearheaded by the numerous waltzes prepared by Johann Strauss II - in the catalogue of his works there are about four hundred - the most famous Viennese musical dynasty of the 19th century, was the only catalyst thanks to which a dance of rather humble origin was transformed into the all-light object of the desire for entertainment of the entire Austro-Hungarian, aristocracy initially, and ultimately, regardless of discrimination and stratifications, the whole civilized world.

Johan Strauss, the son, transformed the waltz into a great expression of the art of music, with a symphonic character, capable of captivating both the concert halls and the dance halls. He was rightly called the King of Waltz. The waltz dominated the thought and heart of the younger Strauss, but he did not fail to endow with his inspirations and other short works of musical or dance magnificence such as marches, polkas, cantrilies.

But the operettas he signed are not of minor value.

His elegant, witty music was challenged and considered light and naive. But what greater vindication than the well-confessed admiration of Brahms, Wagner, Shenberg, Berg and Webern?


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