Giuseppe Verdi - Messa da Requiem

Although Requiem was a religious work, it was presented more in concert halls than in churches. Giuseppe Verdi wrote the famous Requiem in honour of his close friend, Alessandro Manzoni, the great Italian poet, writer, and humanist, who died in 1873. It is a powerful fusion of intense drama and passion, with moments of reverent simplicity. Verdi conducted the first performance at St. Mark's Church in Milan on May 22, 1874, the first anniversary of Manzoni's death. Revolutionary composition Verdi's Requiem has been revolutionary in two respects: First, because while the traditional requiem is a prayer of the living for the dead, Verdi's work was a function as much for the living as for the dead. As Verdi would expect, it's a dramatic, theatrical play. Written for four solo voices (soprano, mezzo-soprano, tenor and bass) with full choir and orchestra, it follows the typical Roman Catholic Latin mass for the dead. The "libretto" certainly comes from the dram

Beethoven - Introduction

Marble bust of Beethoven


Ludwig van Beethoven's work has remained unwavering at the top of the art of sounds since its birth. No one dared to question the value of his masterpieces.

The uniqueness of the German composer is not without cause. It was he who first opposed the necessity of the rules of classicism, he was the one who reversed the hierarchy of reason and emotion in the music.

His music nourished by the impulsive tendencies of a fiery temper inspired the aesthetic that was meant to dominate throughout the 19th century. The musical romance saw his birth secreted by his own automatic stylus.

His music is an unrepeatable happy essay made up of an unhappy man. In the desperation caused to him by the impracticality of his emotional desires, the mental pain was brought to an end by the awareness of the coming toatl deafness.

His inability to hear the sounds of nature, the sounds of life, the sounds of his own music did not prevent him from drawing his precious works with exquisite musical reflections, whose origins must be sought beyond human imagination. He was rightly called the "Titan of Music"!



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