Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Beethoven - Introduction

Marble bust of Beethoven


Ludwig van Beethoven's work has remained unwavering at the top of the art of sounds since its birth. No one dared to question the value of his masterpieces.

The uniqueness of the German composer is not without cause. It was he who first opposed the necessity of the rules of classicism, he was the one who reversed the hierarchy of reason and emotion in the music.

His music nourished by the impulsive tendencies of a fiery temper inspired the aesthetic that was meant to dominate throughout the 19th century. The musical romance saw his birth secreted by his own automatic stylus.

His music is an unrepeatable happy essay made up of an unhappy man. In the desperation caused to him by the impracticality of his emotional desires, the mental pain was brought to an end by the awareness of the coming toatl deafness.

His inability to hear the sounds of nature, the sounds of life, the sounds of his own music did not prevent him from drawing his precious works with exquisite musical reflections, whose origins must be sought beyond human imagination. He was rightly called the "Titan of Music"!



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