Carl Maria von Weber - Euryanthe: Overture

Carl Maria von Weber composed the opera Euryanthe  during the period 1822-23 and first presented it in Vienna on October 25, 1823. The work was based on a French medieval history of 13th century.  The year Euryanthe was presented was marked by Vienna's interest in Italian operas, particularly those of Rossini . Although the initail reception was enthusiastic, the opera lasted only twenty performances, with complaints about the libretto and the length of the opera. For the failure of the play, the somewhat wordy libretto of the poet and writer Helmina von Chézy was blamed. Franz Schubert also commented that "This is not music". Nevertheless, the introduction is an excellent example of orchestral writing and remains one of the best. The Overture begins with an extremely lively and cheerful phrase. Oboe and clarinet, supported by horn and trombones, then present a theme of three emphatic notes, followed by a shorter ascending group of notes (with a stressed rhythm). Soon t

Mozart - Concerto for Flute, Harp and Orchestra in C Major, K299

Mozart composed two flute concertos, even though he didn't particularly love this instrument.

The extraordinary art of the Concerto for Flute, Harp and Orchestra shows Mozart's rare talent to bring out the best in every individual instrument.

Mozart composed this wonderful concerto on his third and final trip to Paris in 1778. It was his only work for flute, harp and orchestra - but not his last for flute.

He arrived in the French capital with his mother on March 23, hoping to repeat the success of his first visit, in 1763, when he was just seven years old. At the time he was treated as a child prodigy and had sat on the knees of the future Queen Marie Antoinette at the Palace of Vesailles. He had even asked her to marry him - a move that had captivated the court.

But this time in his 22 years, he did not repeat his previous triumph. He nevertheless found some students, including Adrien-Louis de Bonnièrs (duc de Guines) and his daughter Marie-Louise-Philippine. They were both enthusiastic amateur musicians. The Duke played well flute and his daughter played an excellent harp - in Mozart's words. That's why Mozart composed this concerto.

It's one of Mozart's kindest concertos. It has three parts and is characterized by the wavy melodies that only the harp is capable of producing.

Movements:

I. Allegro

In the opening movement, harp and flute exhibit together the main melody. This leads to the other small melodies, without any dramatic transaction between the flute, the harp and the orchestra. Finally, the soloists create a melancholy lyricism that is typical of Mozart's genius.

II. Andantino

The second slower movement is sober and soft, with the flute and the harp in perfect agreement, singing to each other. Here, the orchestra's horns and oboes are silenced and only the strings accompany the soloists.

III. Allegro

The last part, is cheerful and dynamic. Flute and harp create several original melodies that would meet the reuirements of two parts of an ordinary concerto. These lead the play to a grand finale, one of Mozart's most delightful.




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