Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Mozart - Andante in C Major for Flute and Orchestra, K315

In December 1777, Mozart wrote to his father in Salzburg about an order he had received from the amateur flute and music patron, Ferdinand De Jean. The order included, among other things, "three short, simple flute concertos".

Mozart wrote two concertos in 1778, but problems arose when the works reached his patron. It is alleged that De Jean rejected  first concert's Andante and asked for its replacement. Mozart responded to this request and wrote an alternative slow part, while the original - shown here - remained independent.

We find it hard to believe that this brilliantly written Andante, with its fluid, melodic flute, is an example of Mozart's composition for his least beloved instrument.

A brief orchestral introduction leads to a slow, lyrical original theme of the flute. The orchestral accompaniment is rich and full, but without ever exceeding the soloist. A string pizzicato leads to a final section - here the flute emerges from its lowest extent to a high point of its range, singing high above the other instruments. A short orchestral part gushing from the last note of the flute.

New, different, rather sad music follows - but no less beautiful. However it does not last long. The earlier ideas are repeated and lead to a cadenza, after which the whole completes the work.  
                           


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