Carl Maria von Weber - Euryanthe: Overture

Carl Maria von Weber composed the opera Euryanthe  during the period 1822-23 and first presented it in Vienna on October 25, 1823. The work was based on a French medieval history of 13th century.  The year Euryanthe was presented was marked by Vienna's interest in Italian operas, particularly those of Rossini . Although the initail reception was enthusiastic, the opera lasted only twenty performances, with complaints about the libretto and the length of the opera. For the failure of the play, the somewhat wordy libretto of the poet and writer Helmina von Chézy was blamed. Franz Schubert also commented that "This is not music". Nevertheless, the introduction is an excellent example of orchestral writing and remains one of the best. The Overture begins with an extremely lively and cheerful phrase. Oboe and clarinet, supported by horn and trombones, then present a theme of three emphatic notes, followed by a shorter ascending group of notes (with a stressed rhythm). Soon t

Mozart - Andante in C Major for Flute and Orchestra, K315

In December 1777, Mozart wrote to his father in Salzburg about an order he had received from the amateur flute and music patron, Ferdinand De Jean. The order included, among other things, "three short, simple flute concertos".

Mozart wrote two concertos in 1778, but problems arose when the works reached his patron. It is alleged that De Jean rejected  first concert's Andante and asked for its replacement. Mozart responded to this request and wrote an alternative slow part, while the original - shown here - remained independent.

We find it hard to believe that this brilliantly written Andante, with its fluid, melodic flute, is an example of Mozart's composition for his least beloved instrument.

A brief orchestral introduction leads to a slow, lyrical original theme of the flute. The orchestral accompaniment is rich and full, but without ever exceeding the soloist. A string pizzicato leads to a final section - here the flute emerges from its lowest extent to a high point of its range, singing high above the other instruments. A short orchestral part gushing from the last note of the flute.

New, different, rather sad music follows - but no less beautiful. However it does not last long. The earlier ideas are repeated and lead to a cadenza, after which the whole completes the work.  
                           


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