Tschaikovsky - 1812 Overture, op. 49

Tchaikovsky's Overture 1812 expresses Russia's nationalist spirit for the Russians' magnificent victory over Napoleon. In 1880, when he was writing the charming Serenade for Strings, Tchaikovsky undertook to compose a "ceremonial introduction" for an exhibition of industrial art in Moscow. As a theme of his introduction he chose Napoleon's Russia Campaign, which ended with the great victory of the Russian Army. At first the composer intended the introduction to be for outdoor performance and felt that it should be "very loud and noisy". Since then the introduction has become his most famous and most popular concert work. The "1812 Overture" is in fact an introduction to a concerto, in other words is a stand-alone work of orchestral music and not an introduction to opera or a more extensive work. The play describes the invasion of Russia by Napoleon's troops in 1812 and their retreat and defeat in the winter of the same year. Despite

Joseph Haydn - Trumpet concerto in E flat

Joseph Haydn composed this concerto in 1796 for the Viennese court trumpeter Anton Weidinger. Weidinger had at the time devised a key instrument that favored his interpretive potential, thereby increasing its ton range compared to the traditional "natural" trumpet. Haydn cleverly exploited this feature by creating one of the few popular trumpet concertos.

Μovements:

Ι. Allegro

The first part, Allegro, begins in the usual way, namely with a "tutti" - a section for the entire orchestra that introduces the main material of the part. Then the solo trumpet enters and confidently suggests the themes. Here's a central "development" section where issues expand further. Then, after a return to the opening material, the orchestra stops playing leaving the trumpet to perform a cadenza. Here, the trills are clearly heard, which the new kind of key trumpet could produce much more easily.


ΙΙ. Andante cantabile

The second part, Andante cantabile, is in a calm, singing style, as its characterization states. The expressive melody first introduced by the violins and then interpreted by the soloist, remains one of the most beautiful and expressive parts ever written for trumpet.


ΙΙΙ. Allegro

The third part, Allegro, is the best known part of this concerto. Its melody is presented first by the violins, after by the entire orchestra and finally by the soloist. Haydn was able to bring out with great knowledge the clean but rounded tone of the trumpet in this brilliant, happy work.



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