Maurice Ravel -The Swiss Watchmaker

Maurice Ravel was born on March 7, 1875, in the small fishing village of Ciboure in the Basque region, near the Franco-Spanish border.  His father, Pierre-Joseph, was a Frenchman of Swiss descent. Pierre-Joseph, a distinguished engineer, met and fell in love with his future wife, a young and beautiful Basque, Marie Delouart, at the time she worked on the Spanish railways.  A few months after Maurice's birth, the family moved from Ciboure to Paris. The parents of Maurice Ravel, Pierre-Joseph Ravel and Marie Delouart. Maurice had a happy childhood. The parents encouraged their two children - Edouard was born in 1878 - to follow their vocation. Maurice's inclination was music. He started music lessons at the age of seven.  Unlike the parents of other composers, Pierre-Joseph viewed positively the prospect of a musical career and sent Maurice to the France's most important musical college, the Conservatoire de Paris in 1889. In the same year, the Paris Exhibition brought toget

Joseph Haydn - Trumpet concerto in E flat

Joseph Haydn composed this concerto in 1796 for the Viennese court trumpeter Anton Weidinger. Weidinger had at the time devised a key instrument that favored his interpretive potential, thereby increasing its ton range compared to the traditional "natural" trumpet. Haydn cleverly exploited this feature by creating one of the few popular trumpet concertos.

Μovements:

Ι. Allegro

The first part, Allegro, begins in the usual way, namely with a "tutti" - a section for the entire orchestra that introduces the main material of the part. Then the solo trumpet enters and confidently suggests the themes. Here's a central "development" section where issues expand further. Then, after a return to the opening material, the orchestra stops playing leaving the trumpet to perform a cadenza. Here, the trills are clearly heard, which the new kind of key trumpet could produce much more easily.


ΙΙ. Andante cantabile

The second part, Andante cantabile, is in a calm, singing style, as its characterization states. The expressive melody first introduced by the violins and then interpreted by the soloist, remains one of the most beautiful and expressive parts ever written for trumpet.


ΙΙΙ. Allegro

The third part, Allegro, is the best known part of this concerto. Its melody is presented first by the violins, after by the entire orchestra and finally by the soloist. Haydn was able to bring out with great knowledge the clean but rounded tone of the trumpet in this brilliant, happy work.



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